About Us

Pupil Premium

Contact Details

Email - admin@st-georgescofe-thanet.kent.sch.uk

Telephone - 01843 609000

NEW PAGE BEING UPDATED. 2016/17 impact will be published once the National Data is available.

The Government provides funding for Pupil Premium students annually; schools have the freedom to spend this in order to raise achievement and progress. The main reason for this is that it has been evidenced through research that nationally, Pupil Premium students do significantly less well than their peers.

Pupil Premium students are those in receipt of free school meals (FSM) at any point in the last six years, along with Looked After Children (LAC, known as Children in Care, CiC, within Kent). In addition to this, children of Service Personnel currently serving or have finished serving in the last 4 years, or in receipt of a Ministry of Defence pension, are also entitled to the Pupil Premium.

If you feel that your child falls within these categories and you would like to discuss the additional support, or if you are unsure if they are eligible for FSM please contact the school reception who will be happy to help.

Post-LAC: If your child has been adopted from care please let us know as we are now able to apply for funding for the government on your behalf. This extra funding will be used for interventions based on the student’s individual needs, to assist both progress and attainment.  Please contact the school if you would like to discuss this with us.

 

Pupil Premium Grant 2016-17

St George's Church of England Foundation School will initially receive funding of £328,930. This is broken down into the following.

FSM £316,030

Service Children £1,500

Post- LAC £11,400

This funding maybe adjusted following the January School Census.

We also work closely with a number of different Virtual Schools and apply for funding based on the individual LAC’s needs.

 

In our pursuit of excellence we spend this allocation on various intervention programmes and also facilitate students’ participation in educational visits. This is to enable the closing of the gap between our disadvantaged and other students.

 

The Intervention Provided

The Sutton Trust toolkit has formed the basis of much expert analysis in this subject field and assesses over 20 different approaches to improving learning in schools, estimating the extra progress over the course of a school year that an ‘average’ student might expect if this strategy was adopted. It identifies the strength of the existing research evidence and makes an estimate of the costs of adopting the approaches.

The top approaches set out by the toolkit are listed below as well as an explanation of how we at St George’s Church of England Foundation School have used the PPG to facilitate these interventions.

Approach

What we do
Student Feedback

Personal Improvement Time stickers

Termly Academic Overviews
Peer Tutoring

Peer Ambassadors that help within Maths and English lessons.

Peer Ambassadors that take students for reading in the mornings and during selected lessons.
Early Years Intervention Student progress measured in every year compared to desired outcomes in year 11.
One to One Specific intervention allocated to students based on Academic Progress linked to target grades. This also includes Saturday School.
Homework After school Homework Club.
ICT

All Pupil Premium Students have access to interactive whiteboards, PC’s, laptops and Ipads to support learning within lessons.

 

Laptops are available for hire to support ‘out of hours learning’.
Phonics Teaching

Specific students selected and support by small group intervention with specialist teaching.

Employment of specialist teacher of Dyslexia

Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) 2015-2016

We received the following funding for 2015-16.

FSM £362,960

Service Children £1,200

Post LAC £11,400

LAC £33,045

Total £408,605


The school spent this allocation in the following way:

Children in Care Teaching Cost £2,663
Pupil Premium Teaching Cost £77,697
Support Staff pupil premium £20,140
Saturday School teaching staff £15,230
One to One Pupil Premium intervention £4,457
Resources £19,724
PIT Stickers £3,457
Counselling £11,875
Youth Empowerment £7,141  
Alternative Curriculum (external) £75,331
Small Group Intervention £86,253
Saturday School Resources        

£7,000

Part salaries of Welfare staff               £32,364
ACU Resources £770
Vocational Programmes £17,000
Lighthouse Project £6,000
CiC Co-ordinator £20,000
Accelerated Reader Programme £6,416
Learning Resource Centre £2,228

 

The Impact of Pupil Premium Spending in 2015-2016

Impact at KS3

Within KS3, academic intervention is mainly focused on improving numeracy and literacy. The following impact was evident through spending in 2015-2016.

Students who have a Hodder Reading age of below 10 are placed on the Accelerated Reader Programme which assists with reading comprehension. Through this reading programme we have also seen an impact on students Hodder Reading age, which measure the mechanics of reading.

 

Hodder Results/ Reading age 2015-2016

In year Progress

In year 7 there were 37 PP students who had a reading age below 10 in September 2015, in July 2016 there were only 24 students. This means 13 year 7 students rose their readings ages to, and above, the target set of 10 years.

In year 8 there were 38 PP students who had a reading age below 10 in September 2015, in July 2016 there were only 20 students. This means 18 year 8 students rose their readings ages to, and above, the target set of 10 years.

In year 9 there were 25 PP students who had a reading age below 10 in September 2015, in July 2016 there were only 17 students. This means 8 year 9 students rose their readings ages to, and above, the target set of 10 years.

Overall Progress

When year 8 students started St Georges C of E Foundation School in year 7, there were 50 PP students with a Hodder Reading age below 10; in July 2016 there were only 20. This means that 30 students have improved their reading ages to one that is above the bench mark of 10 years.

When year 9 students started St Georges C of E Foundation School in year 7, there were 52 PP students with a Hodder Reading age below 10; in July 2016 there were only 17. This means that 35 students have improved their reading ages to one that is above the bench mark of 10 years.

 

Overall Months Progress

Year 7 students made a total of 511 months progress on the Hodder Reading Age test, within the year. This is an average of 14 months per student.

Year 8 students have made a total of 1052 months progress on the Hodder Reading Age test, since year 7 Term 1. This is an average of 22 months per student.

Year 9 students have made a total of 1565 months progress on the Hodder Reading Age test, since year 7 Term 1. This is an average of 31 months per student.

 

Accelerated Reader Results 2015-2016

 

Students who have a Hodder Reading age of below 10 are placed on the Accelerated Reader Programme which assists with reading comprehension.

A cohort of year 7 students made a total of 320 months progress, at an average of 8 months per student.

A cohort of year 8 students made a total of 321 months progress, at an average of 9 months per student.

A cohort of year 9 students made a total of 205 months progress, at an average of 11 months per student.

 

Impact at KS4

KS4- Year 11 Summer Results 2016

St George’s Church of England Foundation School is committed to narrowing the gap and giving our most disadvantaged students the aspirations to improve their life chances. This can be seen by the 3 year trend below and the visible reduction in gap in progress and attainment between our disadvantaged and other students.

 

Within School Gap Disadvantaged Vs Others

  2013 2014 2015
% 5 A*C inc E and M -23 -12 -8
% Expected Progress English -17 -10 -2
% Good Progress English -13 -3 0
% Expected Progress Maths -21 -15 -14
% Good Progress Maths 2 2 -5

 

Due to government performance measures the 2016 summer examination results for our year 11 students cannot be directly compared to previous years. However impact of the PPG can be seen below.

 

The Ofsted inspection dashboard for 2016 highlighted the following strengths:

This is a fantastic achievement for our disadvantaged students, especially as their progress is being measured in comparison to national other students.  The progress 8 score for our disadvantaged students can be seen below, broken down into prior attainment bands.

PROGRESS 8      
  Low Middle High Ability
School Disadvantaged 0.74 -0.01 -0.53
National - others 0.19 0.14 0.07
GAP +0.55 -0.15 -0.60

As you can see our disadvantaged, low ability, students outperformed national other students. This is down to the hard work of both staff and students and proves that the targeted intervention for this ability group had a positive effect.  St Georges C of E Foundation School is ranked in the top 7% nationally for the Progress 8 score for our disadvantaged low ability students, which is a proud moment.

The biggest gap evident when comparing our disadvantaged students with national other students is for our most able. Although on face value the gap looks big, it is not a significant gap due to the low number of high ability disadvantaged students, of which we had 5. 

Although as a school our disadvantaged students are measured against national other students, we also monitor the in school gap. This gap is between our disadvantaged students and other students. 

  DISADVANTAGED OTHERS GAP
P8 OVERALL 0.19 0.29 -0.10
P8 ENGLISH -0.45 -0.27 -0.18
%C OR ABOVE ENGLISH 46 63 -17
P8 MATHS -0.06 0 -0.06
%C OR ABOVE MATHS 45 53 -8
CROSSOVER % 34 44 -10

 

Our overall P8 score for both disadvantaged students and other students was very pleasing, both being above the national average. There was an in school gap of just -0.10.

Performance within English is our biggest concern looking at 2016 results and this is where we also see our biggest in school gap; however this gap is not significant. By looking further into the performance of our students in English, we can conclude that by using 2015 national figures to monitor expected P8 score, when then compared to national 2016 results, students P8 score was lower than expected. Intervention was used to support student progress; however more intervention may have been if the gap was identified as being so big.

 

Progress in Maths was pleasing with our disadvantaged students getting a P8 score of -0.06, this is very close to the expected progress of students from KS2 to KS4. As our other students got a P8 score of 0 the gap was also very minimal.

The only measure that is comparable between 2015 and 2016 results is the percentage crossover of C’s and above in English and Maths. In 2015 our in school gap was 8%, in 2016 our in school gap was 10%. Although it is disappointing that the gap has got bigger this was not a significant increase and still smaller that both county and national gaps.    

 

Change in Disadvantage student numbers!!

Seven year 11 students were removed from the Government Pupil Premium funded list in April 2016, whilst students were in still in year 11. We were not made aware that they were removed until after they had sat their summer examinations. This has meant that all of these students had the PPG used to support them academically, throughout their time at St Georges C of E Foundation School. Although the PPG was used, and the students benefited from improved GCSE and BTEC grades, the removal of these 7 students did have an impact on our performance table data for disadvantaged students.

 

With the removal of these 7 students our percentage of C’s and above dropped 5% from 51% to 46% in English. It also dropped 2% in Maths from 47% to 45%. Both of these reductions had an impact on the crossover figure. If these drops did not occur our crossover percentage gap within school would have remained at 8% as it was in 2015.

The removal of these 7 students also had an impact on our P8 score but not a significant one.

Overall its can be seen that once again our most disadvantaged students have benefitted from both the pastoral and academic support available at St Georges C of E Foundation School. Not only is the in school gap in performance between our disadvantaged students and others very small, when compared to national other students our disadvantaged students are performing comparably well. 

 

2015 PUPIL PREMIUM INFORMATION - please click here