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Sport (BTEC)

General Subject Information

Aim in core PE

To  give a range of activity that will help to promote lifelong participation. This will be done through fun, movement and challenge.
 

Aim in BTEC Sport

BTEC sport provides an opportunity for learners to develop a range of skills and techniques, including personal skills and attributes with are essential for successful  performances in working life.

 

Weeks 1 - 3 1 - 3 4 - 6 4 - 6

Final Lesson

  Girls Boys Girls Boys Mix up Week
Term 1

Netball

Dance

Football

Hockey (SH)

Basketball (SH)

Football

Dance/Dodgeball

Rugby

End of

Term

Term 2

Hockey

Gymnastics

Table Tennis

Netball

Basketball (SH)

Fitness

Fitness Weights rooms

Dodgeball

Football

Rugby

Hockey (SH)/Basketball

End of

Term

Term 3

Tag

OAA

Table Tennis

Badminton (SH)

Football

Badminton (SH)

Netball

Rugby

Table Tennis/Dodgeball

End of

Term

Term 4

Football/Handball/

Frisbee/Dance/

Fitness (Small Gym)

Fitness

Badminton/

Basketball (SH)

Fitness

Dodgeball/Table Tennis

Rugby/Netball

Gymnastics (SH)

Mid

Term

Term 5

Athletics

(Main activity for double - Rounders)

Athletics

(Main activity for double - Tennis)

Athletics

(Main activity for double - Rounders)

Athletics

(Main activity for Double - Softball)

End of

Term

Term 6

Rounders/Athletics/

Tennis/Volleyball

Softball/OAA

Cricket/Athletics

Cricket/Softball

Rounders/Frisbee

Tennis/Rounders/

Softball/Frisbee/

Volleyball

None
 

Procedure if your child is unable to participate in their PE lesson

If your child is ill or injured they must bring a note in from home.
If your child is unable to participate due to a long term medical condition a medical certificate must be provided.  This should be updated termly.
When your child is ill or injured, they must bring in their PE kit and get changed.  They then will be involved within the lesson completing worksheets, officiating and carrying out peer assessments.

Procedure if a child does not bring in kit for the lesson

If your child forgets their kit, staff will provide the student with school kit.  If they refuse to wear this kit they will be given a St George’s after-school detention.
If they then do not engage in the lesson, behaviour support will be contacted if your child fails to follow these procedures and then they will be removed to the safe room. 

Staff

Sarah Kirby Director
Greg Wood Lead Learner
Matt Wakefield Teacher
Lara Tanti Teacher
Steph Valentine Teacher
Louis Waddon Teacher
Justin Cox Teacher
Lesley Buckingham Teacher

Homework

KS3 Term 4 to Term 6

Boys

Girls

KS3 Term 1 to Term 3

Boys
Girls

Level 2 Subject Information

BTEC Level 1/2

The BTEC in Sport provides an opportunity for learners to develop a range of skills and techniques, including personal skills and attributes with are essential for successful performance in working life. 

Mr Wood, Lead Learner for Sport.

Sport - Course Details

Level 3 Subject Information

BTEC Level 3

Sixth form course information can be found in the sixth form courses page.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

TYPES OF CAREERS IN THE SPORT INDUSTRY

The physical fitness and good teamwork which come from an interest in physical education and playing sports can be useful in many different careers including leisure, sport and tourism, construction, education and training, armed forces, security and uniformed services, management, as well as animals, agriculture, plants and land.

 

Applied and job-related learning

There is a range of vocational qualifications (such as BTECs, NVQ/SVQs and diplomas) linked to physical education and sport, including:

  • sports and exercise science
  • sport
  • business, personal training and sports massage
  • travel and tourism
  • outdoor leisure
  • uniformed public services

 

Apprenticeships

There are a range of apprenticeships associated with an interest in PE and sport such as:

  • leisure centre assistant
  • gym instructor
  • PE and school sport coach
  • fitness instructor
  • personal trainer
  • life guard

 

PERSONAL TRAINER

What does a personal trainer do?

Personal trainers talk to clients to find out about their fitness level and health history. They would then:

  • set realistic short-term and long-term goals and plan programmes for reaching them
  • educate, motivate and coach clients to help them follow their programmes safely and effectively
  • give clients advice on health, nutrition and lifestyle changes
  • help clients with their workouts
  • check and record clients' progress, using methods such as measuring heart rate and body-fat levels

In some cases you might work full-time as a gym instructor and do personal training outside your normal hours of work.

What do I need to do to become a personal trainer?

To become a personal trainer you would normally be an experienced fitness instructor with a recognised qualification, such as:

  • Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing – Gym
  • Level 2 Diploma in Health, Fitness, and Exercise Instruction
  • Level 2 Diploma in Instructing Exercise and Fitness

    You can take further qualifications specific to this career, which include:

  • Level 3 Diploma in Fitness Instructing and Personal Training
  • Level 3 Diploma in Personal Training

Fitness instructor and personal trainer courses are widely available through colleges and private training providers.

Membership of a professional organisation, such as the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) or National Register of Personal Trainers (NRPT) is also a good way to demonstrate your competence and skills and can help to improve your career prospects.

If you are already a qualified fitness instructor, you could take the Level 3 Award in Conversion of Advanced Fitness Instructor to Personal Trainer Status. This allows you to change your membership status on the REPs to Personal Trainer.

To work as a personal trainer you must also have public liability insurance and a first aid award. This must include a cardio-pulmonary resuscitation certificate (CPR). Professional bodies can advise on this as well as tax, insurance and self-employment issues.

Related skills

  • Interpersonal skills
  • Organisation
  • Patience

Vocational route

Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing – Gym

Level 2 Diploma in Health, Fitness, and Exercise Instruction

Level 2 Diploma in Instructing Exercise and Fitness

Level 3 Diploma in Fitness Instructing and Personal Training

Level 3 Diploma in Personal Training

Where to find out more

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

What does a secondary school teacher do?

Secondary school teachers teach children from the ages of 11 to 18. You will plan lessons and assess work based on standards set out in the curriculum (England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland all have their own specific curriculum requirements). Communication skills and excellent literacy and numeracy skills are essential for this role

What do I need to do to become a secondary school teacher?

To teach in a UK state school, you will need to a have a degree, and a recognised teaching qualification. There are a number of routes you can take to become a secondary school teacher.

You could follow an undergraduate Initial Teacher Education or Training (ITET) programme, such as a Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree. This is generally a popular route for prospective primary school teachers, but some universities do offer secondary-level BEd programmes for some specialisms.

Alternatively, you could do a degree – this could be in a subject you wish to specialise in like maths, science, or English – then take a postgraduate teacher training programme, such as a PGCE or PGDE. You must have a degree in the subject you have chosen to teach (or a closely related one).

To get into university, you will need to have completed courses like GCSEs, Nationals, A levels, Highers, the International Baccalaureate, or Cambridge Pre-Us. You will also need to pass a police criminal records, or Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), check

Related skills

  • Communication
  • Creativity
  • Discipline
  • Interpersonal skills
  • IT
  • Leadership
  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Organisation
  • Patience
  • Problem solving
  • Teamwork
  • Time management

Essential qualifications

  • Undergraduate education degree
  • OR undergraduate degree AND a PGCE/PGDE
  • DBS or police records check

 

SPORTS COACH

What does a sports coach do?

Sports coaches train and coach amateur and professional athletes. You could be working one-on-one with an individual in sports like tennis, gymnastics or boxing, or you could be working with a group of people like a football, netball or rugby team.

As a sports coach, you’ll ensure the physical and mental wellbeing of the athletes you work with. You’ll make sure they can perform to the best of their abilities in competitions. You’ll need to be physically fit and understand all the rules of your chosen sport. 

What do I need to do to become a sports coach?

To become a sports coach, you will need to have a coaching qualification that is recognised by the governing body for your sport.

If you're interested in taking a higher education qualification in sports science it would be helpful to take a science-related subject at A level. Check entry requirements with universities.

Relevant level 3 vocational courses (eg BTEC National Diploma science or sports and exercise science) are acceptable for some sports science degrees. Check with universities.

Related skills

  • Teamwork
  • Physical fitness
  • People management
  • Communication
  • Leadership

Essential qualifications

  • Coaching qualification (see the website for the governing body of your sport for details)

Desirable qualifications

  • Sports science degree

     

     

     

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